Narrative Checklist/ Rubric

Narratives include…  (Document)

Organizing

  1. ____ Beginning/ Lead
  2. ____ Middle/ Develop.
  3. ____ Conclusion
  4. ____ Problem
  5. ____ Solution

Producing Text

  1. ____  Learning- What did the character learn?
  2. ____  Dialogue
  3. ____  Inner Dialogue
  4. ____  Tension/ Suspense
  5. ____  Attempts to solve
  6. ____  Character solved
  7. ____  Character(s) (S.T.E.A.L.)

Using Language/ Mechanics 

  1. ____  Sentences (capital letters, periods, …)
  2. ____  Indented Paragraphs
  3. ____  Transition Words
  4. ____  Mechanics (spelling, punctuation, capitalization)
  5.   ✓    One inch margins, double spaced, between 1½ – 2 pages (this page has 1 inch margins)

Personal Narrative– The story of an event that happened to you.  In the story you attempt to solve a problem and finally succeed.  In the process you learn something.

Realistic Fiction Narrative- The story of an event that could happen but didn’t.  In the story a character attempts to solve a problem and finally succeeds (usually).  In the process the character learns something.

There are many other types of narratives but most have the same characteristics.

Here is a rubric to try:

                                                     1                                  2                                  3                                  4

Character Character is not well developed; the reader knows almost nothing about the character. Some inner and outer characteristics are known but the author could have shown more. Well developed character with inner and outer characteristics told and shown by the author. Well developed character with many inner and outer characteristics that the author shows.
Situation The author does not show the reader when and where this story takes place. The reader knows a little bit about the time or the place but it is not really clear. Time and place and some more information is given so the reader can understand the story. Wow! The author really shows the when and where by using descriptive language and by how the character acts/ thinks.
Problem The author does not have a clear problem for the main character to solve. The author has a small problem or an easy problem for the main character to solve. The author has a problem that is a realistic challenge for the main character to solve. The author develops a difficult yet realistic problem for the main character to solve.
Resolution The problem was not solved. The problem was solved but not by the main character or it wasn’t a realistic resolution. The main character used his or her characteristics to solve the problem, facing difficulties along the way. The main character used his or her characteristics to solve the problem, faced some difficulties and learned something in the process.
Mechanics/ Sense Looks like the author did not care about the work or the spelling because it looks so messy and has so many mistakes. Really does not make sense. Looks OK but could look better; may have some erasures or just looks kind of messy. Has 3 or more spelling mistakes. Some parts don’t make sense. Looks good, only a couple spelling mistakes. Makes sense. Looks almost like it was done on a computer and has no spelling mistakes. Makes complete sense to any reader.
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